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    Sending an Email Using Python

    Ever wanted to send emails using just Python? A few lines of code and you don’t even need to log into your Gmail account to email anyone in the world. In fact, you can do this in your terminal.

    In a world where up is down, it's heartwarming to know Internet Explorer still tops list of web dev pain points

    Incompatibilities and inconsistent standards support among browsers ensure an ongoing source of headaches. Web developers resent having to deal with Microsoft Internet Explorer and Apple Safari, which they cite among their top three pain points, alongside layout and styling inconsistencies among browsers.…

    The Ultimate Guide on How to Secure WordPress

    So you are thinking about using WordPress on your own Linux host. With WordPress powering such an important part of your business, it is important for it to be stable and secure.

    SSH Tunneling

    In SSH tunneling, an encrypted channel is created between an ssh client and an ssh server. Information flowing within the encrypted tunnel is secure and thus cannot be intercepted. This type of service is in particular used when running insecure protocols such as TightVNC. They can also be used to access internal networks and services running on them, bypass firewalls, as VPNs and as backdoors.

    How open standards guide us in a world of change

    As I write this article in my home office in Beaverton, Oregon, a Portland suburb, I'm relying (and reflecting) on years of work that went into standards like TCP/IP, HTTP, NTP, XMPP, SAML, and many others, as well as open source implementations of these standards from organizations such as the Apache Software Foundation. The combination of these standards and technologies is literally saving lives, as many of us are able to work from home while "flattening the curve."

    The Complicated Firewall

    Until recently, I was content using the Uncomplicated Firewall that comes built-into Ubuntu. And it's called uncomplicated for a reason: its complicated counterpart – the iptables. It's not to say that iptables are difficult to comprehend or even impossible to use, but is rather massive. In other words, it has immense capacity and functionality, and as such is perhaps a lot more complicated.

    4 cool new projects to try in COPR for May 2020

    COPR is a collection of personal repositories for software that isn’t carried in Fedora. Some software doesn’t conform to standards that allow easy packaging. Or it may not meet other Fedora standards, despite being free and open source. COPR can offer these projects outside the Fedora set of packages. Software in COPR isn’t supported by […]

    4 cool new projects to try in COPR for January 2020

    COPR is a collection of personal repositories for software that isn’t carried in Fedora. Some software doesn’t conform to standards that allow easy packaging. Or it may not meet other Fedora standards, despite being free and open source. COPR can offer these projects outside the Fedora set of packages. Software in COPR isn’t supported by […]

    Why everyone is talking about WebAssembly

    If you haven’t heard of WebAssembly yet, then you will soon. It’s one of the industry’s best-kept secrets, but it’s everywhere. It’s supported by all the major browsers, and it’s coming to the server-side, too. It’s fast. It’s being used for gaming. It’s an open World Wide Web Consortium (W3C), the main international standards organization for the web, standard. It’s platform-neutral and can run on Linux, Macs, and Windows.

    4 cool new projects to try in COPR for October 2019

    COPR is a collection of personal repositories for software that isn’t carried in Fedora. Some software doesn’t conform to standards that allow easy packaging. Or it may not meet other Fedora standards, despite being free and open source. COPR can offer these projects outside the Fedora set of packages. Software in COPR isn’t supported by […]

    What politics can teach us about open source

    Many sobering lessons from history emphasize democracy is not a finished product. The Roman Empire ended in a dictatorship, while the feudal Middle Ages delivered the Magna Carta and the Renaissance; despite the American Revolution, slavery continued for many years, while the French Revolution resulted in the restoration of the monarchy. That said, more people are living in democracies around the world today than at any time before, and living standards in democracies continue to improve. read more

    Openwashing Report: It’s Getting Worse, Fast. Everything is Apparently ‘Open’ Now Even Though It’s Actually Proprietary.

    The latest examples (this past week’s) of openwashing in the media, ranging from 5G to surveillance

    4 cool new projects to try in COPR for August 2019

    COPR is a collection of personal repositories for software that isn’t carried in Fedora. Some software doesn’t conform to standards that allow easy packaging. Or it may not meet other Fedora standards, despite being free and open source. COPR can offer these projects outside the Fedora set of packages. Software in COPR isn’t supported by […]

    Understanding Public Key Infrastructure and X.509 Certificates

    Public Key Infrastructure (PKI) provides a framework of encryption and data communications standards used to secure communications over public networks. At the heart of PKI is a trust built among clients, servers and certificate authorities (CAs). This trust is established and propagated through the generation, exchange and verification of certificates. This article focuses on understanding the certificates used to establish trust between clients and servers. These certificates are the most visible part of the PKI (especially when things break!), so understanding them will help to make sense of—and correct—many common errors.

    Crazy Compiler Optimizations

    Kernel development is always strange. Andrea Parri recently posted a patch to change the order of memory reads during multithreaded operation, such that if one read depended upon the next, the second could not actually occur before the first.

    Don't test in production? Test in production!

    If you last updated your IT security standards five or more years ago, chances are they don't line up well with the realities of today's DevOps and site reliability engineering (SRE) practices. One particularly sticky topic is testing in production—and, thus, testing with production data—because DevOps and SRE blur the line between what is production and what is not; what is a test and what is not. To clear up some of the confusion, we'll dig into these questions: read more

    Google's Ad API is Better Than Facebook's, But

    … with a few important omissions. Google’s tool meets four of experts’ five minimum standards ? Last month, Mozilla released an analysis of Facebook’s ad archive API, a tool that … Read more The post Google’s Ad API is Better Than Facebook’s, But… appeared first on The Mozilla Blog.

    4 cool new projects to try in COPR for April 2019

    COPR is a collection of personal repositories for software that isn’t carried in Fedora. Some software doesn’t conform to standards that allow easy packaging. Or it may not meet other Fedora standards, despite being free and open source. COPR can offer these projects outside the Fedora set of packages. Software in COPR isn’t supported by […]

    Standards and open source: Why are patents treated differently?

    Development of standards specifications and development of open source software have much in common: both are mechanisms by which competitors can collaborate; both can facilitate interoperability; both can be used to facilitate the adoption of new technologies; both can be used to crystallize or harmonize mature technologies. read more

    If Software Is Funded from a Public Source, Its Code Should Be Open Source

    If we pay for it, we should be able to use it. Perhaps because many free software coders have been outsiders and rebels, less attention is paid to the use of open source in government departments than in other contexts. It's unfortunate that the most famous attempt to convert a government IT system from proprietary code to open source—the city of Munich—proved such a difficult experience. Although last year saw a decision to move back to Windows, that seems to be more a failure of IT management, than of the code itself.

    FOSS Project Spotlight: Mender.io, an Open-Source Over-the-Air Software Update Manager for IoT Devices

    Mender is an open-source (Apache 2.0) project to address over-the-air (OTA) software update management for Linux-based IoT devices. When we researched this five years ago, there were no open-source end-to-end (device-to-server) options to manage the lifecycle of OTA updates for connected devices. Some open-source options were available, but they either had a proprietary management server, or they were client-only and required integration with another back-end server.

    Tips and tricks for using CUPS for printing with Linux

    Did you ever try to configure a printer on a GNU/Linux desktop distribution at the end of the '90s? Or even before? To make a long story short: That was fine if you worked at a large organization with an IT team to handle it and dedicated hardware or a printing server. There were many different standards and protocols to handle printers. And only a few big vendors (usually Unix vendors) provided specific support and drivers for their entire range of products. read more

    Red Hat gets heebie-jeebies over MongoDB's T&Cs squeeze: NoSQL database dropped from RHEL 8B over license

    'The Server Side Public License v1 does not meet standards' MongoDB justified its decision last October to shift the free version of its NoSQL database software, MongoDB Community Server, from the open-source GNU Affero General Public License to the not-quite-so-open Server Side Public License (SSPL) by arguing that cloud providers sell open-source software as a service without giving back.…

    Snakes on a Spaceship - An Overview of Python in Heliophysics

    • arXiv.org - Cornell University; By A.G. Burrell, A. Halford, J. Klenzing, R. A. Stoneback, S. K. Morley, A. M. Annex, K. M. Laundal, A. (Posted by number6x on Jan 16, 2019 3:23 AM EDT)
    • Story Type: Reviews; Groups: Developer, Python, Standards
    A scientific paper that discusses the standards for peer review of code and analysis using the open source language Python in scientific research.

    4 cool new projects to try in COPR for December 2018

    COPR is a collection of personal repositories for software that isn’t carried in Fedora. Some software doesn’t conform to standards that allow easy packaging. Or it may not meet other Fedora standards, despite being free and open source. COPR can offer these projects outside the Fedora set of packages. Software in COPR isn’t supported by […]

    Lessons in Vendor Lock-in: Shaving

    Freedom is powerful. When you start using free software, a whole world opens up to you, and you start viewing everything in a different light. You start noticing when vendors don't release their code or when they try to lock you in to their products with proprietary protocols. These vendor lock-in techniques aren't new or even unique to software. Shaving companies long have tried to force customer loyalty with incompatible proprietary products that make you stay on an upgrade treadmill.

    Linaro partners with IIC on upcoming 96Boards Industrial Edition spec

    Linaro and the Industrial Internet Consortium announced a partnership to collaborate on open source Arm standards for industrial IoT involving OTA, TSN, and security, as well as develop a 96Boards Industrial Edition spec. In September Arm-backed Linaro, which creates open source Linux and Android code for Arm devices and oversees the 96Boards open hardware standard, […]

    3 emerging tipping points in open source

    Over the last two decades, open source has been expanding into all aspects of technology—from software to hardware; from small, disruptive startups to large, boring enterprises; from open standards to open patents. read more

    My first FOSS love was Perl

    Set the wayback machine to 1993. I was working at a small company as a programmer and product deployment specialist. The product was COBOL-based and the OS was SCO Xenix. Both were based on open standards, but not open source. I was hired because I knew the medical software business and I had experience in several flavors of what was then called Micro-Unix. I didn't know a thing about COBOL, but that was the job opening. (PS, if you get any calls from the past: COBOL is not hard to learn.) read more

    Is your startup built on open source? 9 tips for getting started

    When I started Gluu in 2009, I had no idea how difficult it would be to start an open source software company. Using the open source development methodology seemed like a good idea, especially for infrastructure software based on protocols defined by open standards. By nature, entrepreneurs are optimistic—we underestimate the difficulty of starting a business. However, Gluu was my fourth business, so I thought I knew what I was in for. But I was in for a surprise! read more

    The Leading Linux Desktop Platform Issues Of 2018

    Linux developer Simon Peter who has spent years working on application standards like AppImage and Klik recently presented on what he believes are the 2018 Desktop Linux Platform Issues and the unfortunate continually moving target of "the year of the Linux desktop" that never materializes.

    Akraino Edge Stack project adds members and preps edge computing

    The LF’s Akraino Edge Stack project for standardizing open source edge computing software for basestatons and other telecom and IoT systems, added new members including Arm, Dell, Ericsson, Juniper, and Qualcomm. The ubiquitous topic of edge computing has so far primarily focused on IoT and machine learning. A new Linux Foundation project called Akraino Edge […]

    Open Metrics Project Comes to the Cloud Native Computing Foundation

    The Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) is expanding its roster, announcing that it has accepted the Open Metrics project as a Sandbox effort. New effort aims to help define a standard format for cloud native server application metrics.

    Learn how to install several VPN protocols on your Linux device

    Linux is one of the most used operating systems, and it is highly regarded for its top-notch security and privacy features. However, it is never a bad idea to mix in a VPN with powerful encryption just to add that extra layer of security.

    4 cool new projects to try in COPR for July 2018

    COPR is a collection of personal repositories for software that isn’t carried in Fedora. Some software doesn’t conform to standards that allow easy packaging. Or it may not meet other Fedora standards, despite being free and open source. COPR can offer these projects outside the Fedora set of packages. Software in COPR isn’t supported by […]

    FOSS Project Spotlight: Pydio Cells, an Enterprise-Focused File-Sharing Solution

    Pydio Cells is a brand-new product focused on the needs of enterprises and large organizations, brought to you from the people who launched the concept of the open-source file sharing and synchronization solution in 2008. The concept behind Pydio Cells is challenging: to be to file sharing what Slack has been to chats—that is, a revolution in terms of the number of features, power and ease of use.

    6 RFCs for understanding how the internet works

    Reading the source is an important part of open source software. It means users have the ability to look at the code and see what it does. But "read the source" doesn't apply only to code. Understanding the standards the code implements can be just as important. These standards are codified in documents called "Requests for Comments" (RFCs) published by the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF). Thousands of RFCs have been published over the years, so we collected a few that our contributors consider must-reads.

    Weekend Reading: Multimedia

    Put the fun back in computing. With this weekend's reading, we encourage you to build yourself an internet radio station, create your own Audible?or even live-stream your pets on YouTube. Sky's the limit with Linux. Enjoy!

    Linux Gets Loud

    Exploring the current state of musical Linux with interviews of developers of popular packages. Linux is ready for prime time when it comes to music production. New offerings from Linux audio developers are pushing creative and technical boundaries...

    EFAIL and KMail

    On Monday, a security vulnerability in the OpenPGP and S/MIME email encryption standards and the email clients using those, called EFAIL was published. What is this about and how is KMail affected?

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